Monday, April 3, 2017

Planning to Get Pregnant In Your Thirties?

pic from clipartfest.com

If you are in your 30's, you might be starting to wonder about your fertility time frame, and how much “time” you have left when it comes to trying to conceive. When it comes to fertility, a woman's thirties are pretty much the middle of the road when it comes to fertility. Your fertility isn't as high as it was in your twenties, but there is still plenty of time to have a baby. Women have a very high chance of conceiving in their early 30's, but once they are nearing their 40's, fertility begins to decrease.

Moms in their 30's are usually much more prepared to have a baby than when they were in their twenties. Moms are usually more financially stable and have more job security later on. Unfortunately once a woman hits around the age of 35, there is a huge drop in fertility. In your early 30's, your chances of getting pregnant are very close to the same level as your late 20's. However, once a woman gets to her mid thirties, fertility declines and there are also many more chances for health problems and pregnancy complications. Truth be told, early thirties are much less complicated for getting pregnant than late 30's. If you are interested in getting pregnant in your thirties, go ahead and talk to your doctor and see if he or she has any advice for you. 

Infertility and Age

Age-related infertility is becoming more common as more women delay childbearing. Approximately 20% of American women wait until after age 35 to begin their families.

A female is born with an estimated 1 million eggs in her ovaries. By the time she reaches puberty she will have about 300,000 eggs left. Of these, only about 300 eggs will be ovulated during her reproductive years, and the rest will undergo a degenerative process known as atresia.

Despite the advances in assisted reproductive technology (ART), a woman’s age still affects the success rate in getting pregnant. A healthy 30-year-old woman has about a 20% chance each month of getting pregnant, while a healthy 40-year-old has about a 5% chance each month (in many cases, even when using ART). 
Source: https://www.acog.org/-/media/NewsRoom/MediaKit.pdf 

Note: This is a sponsored post.

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